" A photo is a return ticket to a moment in time"

Tuesday, 17 January 2012

Saddle-Makers Wheelwrights & Brass Founders...............



~ Walkerville Wesleyan Cemetery ~


Opened in 1849 this historic small graveyard
is the final resting place for many of South Australia's most
prominent settlers together with lime-burners, saddle-makers
flour millers, wheelwrights and brass founders





Although only a small city cemetery it's a place you could meander
around in for hours - each site telling a story of other times
some quite heart-warming but others extremely sad.




I wondered about John - he was one of the very first
to be buried  here and his grave lies up against the
 hand-made stone wall that surrounds the area

"Departed this life in 1850 - Deeply regretted by a large circle of friends"
That sort of warmed the cockles of my heart.
.......................................


This is my contribution to  "Taphophile Tragics" 
and "Our World Tuesday"


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23 comments:

Sylvia K said...

What a great post for the day, Dianne! I have so enjoyed visiting some of the very old graveyards here in the states, particularly in the deep south. Fascinating, like these! Love your captures! Hope you have a great week!

Sylvia

Joyful said...

Some beautiful photos here of a lovely resting place.

Julie said...

I wonder what a 'lime-burner' used to do ... other than burn lime. I thought that was one way of getting rid of the 'evidence'!

This is a gorgeous little graveyard, Dianne. I love the landscape evident from your first photograph. For mine, when I see a headstone erected by 'a wide circle of friends' it sort of indicates that the deceased had no family, and that everyone had to chip in to pay for his burial. A sad way to depart.

I note young Nicholas departing at the age of 4, and this being his only mark upon our earth.

A lovely post in your usual beautiful style. I thank you for your continued participation in Taphophile Tragics. I value your contribution.

eileeninmd said...

Great post,Dianne! It is a pretty resting spot. I have been enjoying some old cemeteries doing research on my ancestry. Great photos, have a wonderful day!

VioletSky said...

These smaller church cemeteries always seem more poignant to me as everyone there would have known each other, or would have at least had a connection through belonging to the church.
That is a touching tribute to be "deeply regretted by a wide circle of friends" when one has no family around.

Gemma Wiseman said...

The style of the headstone in the last photo is fascinating! It has a kind of cathedral feel! And the fact this one seems to have no family to mourn, but friends step in gives a wonderful sense of community at the time!

Jack said...

You have really embraced Julie's new meme. Today's photos are excellent, as always. The John Taylor stone gets one thinking, doesn't it?

NixBlog said...

Beautiful shots, Dianne. The first one is particularly idyllic.
Lime burners used to prepare quicklime by heating stone rich in calcium carbonate (like marble) to convert it to calcium oxide (quicklime). This was soaked in water to slake it and it was then used in construction.

Valerie said...

Very poignant captures Dianne, in an historic part of Adelaide's surrounds. The artistic stonework in that last shot is just beautiful. Thanks for sharing. Have a great week.

Dianne said...

Nick .... Thank for that info about lime-burners - it's a name I often come across but have never known exactly what the trade entailed. That's the beauty of blogging we find out so much from others.

Ann said...

Its a shame there aren't these small church cemeteries any more. They have much more atmosphere than the modern, large, multidenominational ones

Peter said...

A beautiful piece of stonework, great choice.

Mark said...

Many old houses in Grafton are built upon the efforts of the local Aboriginal people.
In the early days labourers collected tons and tons of old oyster shells that the Kooris had piled up over the years to burn and make lime for mortar. When you look carefully at the old houses you can see fragments of shells in the cement.
What great pictures Dianne, looks like a great cemetery.

Jim said...

Quite an interesting post.

Dianne said...

I love old cemeteries
so much history

wouldn't it be wonderful to say to someone 'I'm a wheelwright, and what do you do?' :)

Luna Miranda said...

beautiful headstones. i love old cemeteries, too.

Dianne said...

Mark........ That's amazing that they used the old oyster shells in the production of lime for mortar - very resourceful !

Joan Elizabeth said...

A pretty cemetery nicely shot.

Kath Lockett said...

My great-great-great and merely great-grandparents are buried there. Lived in Levi Park next to the grand old home which is now a caravan park. My grandmother remembered peering through the hedges to see horse-drawn coaches pull up to drop off local dignitaries....

PerthDailyPhoto said...

What a beautiful old cemetery, even the wall around it is so special. So many stories interred forever. You're so right Dianne, you learn the most interesting things in the course of a blogging day! I'm enjoying Julie's new theme so much.

Karin M. said...

Beautiful photos of this silent stones ... a peaceful place.
Greeting Karin

Kathy said...

I love ornamental iron fences in cemeteries. I don't believe I've ever seen one this small but it seems appropriate.

Annie said...

I'm impressed by the fact that no matter where these decorative fences appear, they seem to be the same all over the world. The height may differ but the design appears to be almost universal.

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