" A photo is a return ticket to a moment in time"

Monday, 20 June 2011

It Must Be Winter........


Adelaide Central Market

The love em! or hate em! vegetables.

I've never been fond of eating turnips
but I thought they looked quite lovely all stacked up in rows

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14 comments:

jennyfreckles said...

Not my favourite veg either, though they are OK in stews. But they make a very attractive photo.

Rae Walter said...

Great capture and colours Dianne, even if not my favourite veggie.

cieldequimper said...

I don't particularly like them though they can be lovely in a veg soup. They look so appetising though!

Craig said...

Poor turnips. I'll vote for you! And they look positively sexy in your photo Dianne!

Kay L. Davies said...

Yes, they look great. And taste good in stews and soups, or mashed with carrots. The purple-top turnip is much more expensive in Canada than the lowly rutabaga. I often wonder which one my grandparents referred to when they spoke of "neeps and tatties".
— K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

Paul said...

Jennyfrecles beat me to it, yep I only really like them in stews also. Have to agree they do look nice stacked up.

Dianne said...

Kay:- I've heard that expression "Neeps and Tatties" maybe they mean Turnips and Potatoes?

Lúcia said...

You are right Dianne, they do look good. ;-)

PerthDailyPhoto said...

They do look good Dianne, and delish in soup, so two out of three isn't bad!

Craig said...

Coming from Scotland, I can confirm that neeps and tatties are indeed turnips and potatoes. I think it refers back to poor peoples food or food during times of famine.

Alan O'Riordan said...

I love 'em, personally! And this pic makes them look especially tasty:-)

Dianne said...

Craig:- Thanks for that bit of info - thankfully we don't have to revert back to neeps and tatties today.

Kevin said...

The turnips make a great photo. I have only had them in soup. Young ones are best for this I am told.

Julie said...

"neeps and tatties' is not known to me, but I used to call this vegetable a 'swede' which was short for a swede turnip. My father grew them in paddocks when I was young, harrowed them, then let the animals in to forage. The three of us, we go along finding some of our own and happily munch away for the rest of the day. Still much prefer then raw than cooked.

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